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divorce Archives

"Gray divorce" continues to rise

In North Carolina and across the country, a growing number of Americans are filing for divorce later in life. When people think of a couple deciding to legally separate, they may imagine young people with or without children. However, even as the divorce rate has held steady or declined for most demographics across the country, that rate has increased significantly for older Americans. Since 1990, the divorce rate for people 50 and over has doubled while that same rate has tripled for people 65 and older.

Research suggests certain wedding dates may not be so lucky

For couples planning to tie the knot in North Carolina, there are many important decisions to make, one of which is the actual date of the wedding. Some individuals insist on picking a wedding day they believe is "lucky" for one reason or another. However, researchers in Australia say that some popular wedding dates might not be so lucky after all.

Alimony tax changes could affect retirement as well

For people in North Carolina who will finalize their divorces in 2019, the impact of the new spousal support tax rules could have more far-reaching effects than they realize. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, passed in December 2017, put in place a significant change in how taxes will be handled in relation to alimony payments for all people who finalize their divorces after 2018 comes to an end. The changes have pushed many people to move to finalize their marital splits before the end of the year in order to retain their eligibility for the existing system.

Why divorcing in 2018 could be financially beneficial

For those living in North Carolina who are thinking of filing for divorce, it would be a good idea to consider the timing of the separation and how changing laws may affect the outcome. With the passage of the new tax code, some may find it more advantageous to finalize their divorce before 2019. To help make sense of the confusion, there are some important aspects to keep in mind.

North Carolina's legal separation period

Unlike other states, North Carolina has a very long period in which a couple must be legally separated before they can get a divorce. Specifically, a couple has to be legally separated for basically one year before a court can grant a final and permanent decree of dissolution.

Premarital agreements in North Carolina

North Carolina law allows couples planning to marry to enter into premarital agreements before they tie the knot. These agreements are important not only in the event of a divorce or separation, but also when one of the spouses simply wants to protect the inheritance of any children from a previous relationship.

How will spousal support be determined in my divorce?

Spousal support can be one of the most significant concerns during a couple's divorce. Spousal support may be awarded to one spouse during the divorce process of may be agreed upon by the couple. Divorcing couples may wonder how spousal support is determined and what purpose it serves. Spousal support is intended to provide assistance to a lower-wage earning spouse or a spouse that did not work during the marriage and may have remained in the home to care for the household and children.

The family law system helps with a range of divorce concerns

This blog recently discussed alimony but alimony is just one of many concerns divorcing couples may have. The family law system provides a range of resources and help for divorcing couples to help them address their divorce-related concerns. Divorcing couples have many understandable concerns related to their children, their property, their finances and assets and other concerns.

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