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+1-704-380-9128

Vigorous Advocacy

FOR YOU

We provide aggressive and loyal service for individuals during difficult personal and family situations.

Child custody options for North Carolina parents

On Behalf of | Feb 26, 2021 | Child Custody | 0 comments

When a North Carolina married couple with children files for divorce, it brings numerous issues front and center that they must resolve before achieving a settlement. Child custody is a top priority, and a concerned parent can take comfort in knowing that he or she can create a co-parenting plan that keeps the children’s best interests in mind. Most family court judges agree that children typically fare best when their parents share custody.

Many parents like to keep things simple

There are numerous options available to share physical custody of children in divorce. One of the most common shared custody plans is also the most basic. Co-parents alternate weeks and usually transfer custody on Fridays or during a weekend. With this type of plan, kids live at one parent’s house one week, then transfer to the other parent’s house the next, and this routine continues throughout the year.

Child custody plans can be customized to meet a family’s needs

Parents can also choose to rotate their custody schedule by transferring custody after two or more days, midweek. For instance, a family’s routine might include traveling back and forth between parents’ houses every three days. To determine which type of schedule best fits a particular family’s needs, parents will want to consider issues such as their own work schedules, children’s extra-curricular activities and which plan causes the least amount of disruption and stress.

Both parents must adhere to the terms of a signed agreement

North Carolina parents are free to create their own child custody plan. Once they agree to a specific plan, and the court issues a formal custody order, both parents must adhere to its terms, no matter what. If one or both parents determine a need to change their agreement, a request for modification must be filed in court. The existing court order remains in effect unless and until the court grants the request.